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LI schools creating next-generation libraries to ready students for future

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Students at the Cyrus Wood 6th Grade Center in the South Huntington School District learn how to write computer code, use 3D printers, experience virtual reality, and take advantage of green screens in a library that was once full of books. is.

Like any public school library on Long Island, the space has been transformed into a place for students to collaborate, and technological advances have created new ways of learning. In many school districts, school libraries have an open-air concept, offering students opportunities for podcasts, coding, or video conferencing. The furniture is moveable, with a private study room, and the room still has books, but the stack of tall bookshelves has been removed.

Both Nassau and Suffolk neighborhoods, including Amityville, Bethpage, Baldwin, Helix, South Huntington and Valley Stream 13, have recently upgraded their libraries. Some used funding from bonds, others used budget from the General Fund. And plans for the future are underway. For example, the Wantag School District plans to hold a bond ballot next month that includes funding for a complete renovation of the high school’s library and media center.

“they [libraries] Karl Vitevic, Director of School Library Systems, Eastern Suffolk BOCES, said: These have always been communal spaces used by students for research, which is even more important now that advanced level research is taking place. Placements or International Baccalaureate classes. Additionally, the library’s online database and other sources can provide resources in multiple languages, including Spanish to accommodate the island’s growing Spanish-speaking population, he said. rice field.

“It has changed and is still evolving,” says Vitevitch.

The Cyrus Wood Library in South Huntington is now a ‘makerspace’. This is a collaborative work space where students use both tech and non-tech tools. It is part of a library renovation of five of his seven buildings in the district, which opened last year and is nearly complete. There is a green screen where students can create background visual effects, 3D printers, and virtual reality systems. Students take classes on her Chromebooks.

There are still stacks of books in the room, but they are no longer the focus.

“We have learned that we no longer need traditional libraries. We provide the 21st century skills needed for high school and high school past,” said John Murphy, Associate Superintendent of Curriculum and Education at South Huntington.

A recent lesson combined old and new media. The students received his Rick Riordan book, The Lightning Thief, and a teacher’s lesson on how to create a 3D-printed digital lightning bolt on his Chromebook.

12-year-old Christian Diaz loved the lesson and used the virtual reality system to “ride” the roller coaster in class.

“It’s really fun,” he said.

Baldwin High School opened a new library at the high school earlier this month. Officials there call it a “collaboratory,” and it’s very different from the traditional libraries that used to be there, superintendent Shari Kamhi said.

It features five private glass-enclosed spaces where students can meet to work on projects together. The room also has video conferencing facilities, allowing students to collaborate with outside organizations and write on tables and walls like a whiteboard. There are comfortable seats. Camhi said the district did most of the work in-house.

“When you talk to students, you really need a collaborative space,” she said. “This is just the next generation of what is formally known as the library…it’s not just books and periodicals, her resources and technology online, it’s a place where people work together.”

The Helix School District opened its middle and high school libraries after a complete renovation this year. Gone are the tall wooden bookshelves to give the room a more open and airy feel, said Michael Imondi, director of English arts, reading and library services.

The furniture is movable and the lighting has been changed. There are whiteboard tables for interactive learning, and both libraries have comfortable chairs and a place to charge the student’s Chromebook.

The high school has 11 silent study spots, and former computer labs have been converted into small rooms where students can work in silence. The high school library also has a poster printing machine.

Libraries also have more digital resources to offer, says Imondi. I’ve scaled back some of the books, but I believe in the importance of having access to them. ”

Changes were also made at the beginner level. In the Valley Stream District 13, which caters to pre-kindergarten through her sixth grade, two libraries have been renovated to provide more space for student activities. Librarian CaroleAnn Weik has integrated STEM and her STEAM lessons with traditional books.

She has taught students how to make a Ferris wheel out of popsicle sticks and modify paper airplanes to see how they fly.

“We have extra floor space so we can accommodate small groups and some STEM and STEAM activities,” she said.

Students at the Cyrus Wood 6th Grade Center in the South Huntington School District learn how to write computer code, use 3D printers, experience virtual reality, and take advantage of green screens in a library that was once full of books. is.

Like any public school library on Long Island, the space has been transformed into a place for students to collaborate, and technological advances have created new ways of learning. In many school districts, school libraries have an open-air concept, offering students opportunities for podcasts, coding, or video conferencing. The furniture is moveable, with a private study room, and the room still has books, but the stack of tall bookshelves has been removed.

Both Nassau and Suffolk neighborhoods, including Amityville, Bethpage, Baldwin, Helix, South Huntington and Valley Stream 13, have recently upgraded their libraries. Some used funding from bonds, others used budget from the General Fund. And plans for the future are underway. For example, the Wantag School District plans to hold a bond ballot next month that includes funding for a complete renovation of the high school’s library and media center.

“they [libraries] Karl Vitevic, Director of School Library Systems, Eastern Suffolk BOCES, said: These have always been communal spaces used by students for research, which is even more important now that advanced level research is taking place. Placements or International Baccalaureate classes. Additionally, the library’s online database and other sources can provide resources in multiple languages, including Spanish to accommodate the island’s growing Spanish-speaking population, he said. rice field.

“It has changed and is still evolving,” says Vitevitch.

Grade 6s are working in the school library on Tuesday, November 22, 2022 at the Cyrus Wood Grade 6 Center at Huntington Station, using Chromebooks and other digital resources. Credit: Danielle Silverman

The Cyrus Wood Library in South Huntington is now a ‘makerspace’. This is a collaborative work space where students use both tech and non-tech tools. It is part of a library renovation of five of his seven buildings in the district, which opened last year and is nearly complete. There is a green screen where students can create background visual effects, 3D printers, and virtual reality systems. Students take classes on her Chromebooks.

There are still stacks of books in the room, but they are no longer the focus.

“We have learned that we no longer need traditional libraries. We provide the 21st century skills needed for high school and high school past,” said John Murphy, Associate Superintendent of Curriculum and Education at South Huntington.

A recent lesson combined old and new media. The students received his Rick Riordan book, The Lightning Thief, and a teacher’s lesson on how to create a 3D-printed digital lightning bolt on his Chromebook.

12-year-old Christian Diaz loved the lesson and used the virtual reality system to “ride” the roller coaster in class.

“It’s really fun,” he said.

This is a new state-of-the-art library that recently opened...

This is the new state-of-the-art library recently opened at Baldwin High School in Baldwin on Tuesday, November 22, 2022.
Credit: Newsday/J. Conrad Williams Jr.

Baldwin High School opened a new library at the high school earlier this month. Officials there call it a “collaboratory,” and it’s very different from the traditional libraries that used to be there, superintendent Shari Kamhi said.

It features five private glass-enclosed spaces where students can meet to work on projects together. The room also has video conferencing facilities, allowing students to collaborate with outside organizations and write on tables and walls like a whiteboard. There are comfortable seats. Camhi said the district did most of the work in-house.

“When you talk to students, you really need a collaborative space,” she said. “This is just the next generation of what is formally known as the library…it’s not just books and periodicals, her resources and technology online, it’s a place where people work together.”

The Helix School District opened its middle and high school libraries after a complete renovation this year. Gone are the tall wooden bookshelves to give the room a more open and airy feel, said Michael Imondi, director of English arts, reading and library services.

The furniture is movable and the lighting has been changed. There are whiteboard tables for interactive learning, and both libraries have comfortable chairs and a place to charge the student’s Chromebook.

The high school has 11 silent study spots, and former computer labs have been converted into small rooms where students can work in silence. The high school library also has a poster printing machine.

Libraries also have more digital resources to offer, says Imondi. I’ve scaled back some of the books, but I believe in the importance of having access to them. ”

Changes were also made at the beginner level. In the Valley Stream District 13, which caters to pre-kindergarten through her sixth grade, two libraries have been renovated to provide more space for student activities. Librarian CaroleAnn Weik has integrated STEM and her STEAM lessons with traditional books.

She has taught students how to make a Ferris wheel out of popsicle sticks and modify paper airplanes to see them fly.

“We have extra floor space so we can accommodate small groups and some STEM and STEAM activities,” she said.

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